1 Reply Latest reply: May 15, 2014 10:13 AM by Olly Bond RSS

    Fast way of generating a simple summary to see distinct values of a field?

    MonUserCJ _

      Hey all,

       

      One of the most common things I do in Monarch is create summaries to see all the distinct values of a field. This way, I can determine if it contains important data so I can include the field in a delimited export.

       

      I do this so often that I'm interested in seeing if Monarch has a faster way to do this. Normally, I'll bring up the summary pane, click new summary, add the field, and then look. Ideally, I would like a faster way to do this (preferably from the table pane). Also, I wish the summaries would automatically name themselves after the field used if it's just one field.

       

      Does anyone have any guidance on how to perform this sort of analysis faster? I'd appreciate any help that anyone can provide. Thanks.

        • Fast way of generating a simple summary to see distinct values of a field?
          Olly Bond

          Hello CJ,

           

          That's a helpful idea - a quick overview of the distinct values, or even a count of the distinct values, for a field. I think you could get some way towards what you want by building a summary in a the reference model and then importing that into whichever model you're working on.

           

          If you open up the model: C:\Users\Public\Documents\Monarch\Models\UserDefinedFunctions.xmod with the report "Classic.prn", and create a calculated field called Key, defined as Character and just set to be equal to Media. Then create a summary called KeyCount which just has Key as the key field, and count as the measure. Save the model with the summary definition, and return to your model. Now you can import the summary easily into your model, and as long as you have a field called Key, you'll have a quick way to get view you want.

           

          You could also create a pre-canned summary with one down key and one across key, to give you a view of the spread of values across two dimensions.

           

          Hope this helps,

           

          Olly