2 Replies Latest reply: May 15, 2014 9:55 AM by Tom Whiteside RSS

    Pre-sales Questions

    Tom Murdock

      Is there a size limit to the file that can be imported into Monarch?

       

      Are there any special PC requirements for using Version 7 of Monarch?

       

      Thanks,

       

      Tom

        • Pre-sales Questions
          Grant Perkins

          Hello Tom and welcome!

           

          I think the specs pages on the web site (link at the bottom of this page then click on the V7 banner at the upper right of the screen) seem to be very honest. Files larger than 2Gb seems a reasonable assumption. I have been working with 3 large tab delimited files which, when everything is fitted together using Monarch V7, results in a data table of 473,000 records each with around 100 fields - maybe a few more.

           

          When exported as an MS Access database it comes out as 930Mb. That all seems to work fine as long as I get my logic right for the stuff I am calculating!

           

          How big do you need to go? I might be able to simulate a test if you are worried.

           

          Suggested PC requirements are also listed on the specs pages. Obviously the more you have of everything the better it may be though that depends on what you are actually doing. If working with large files a good supply of memory and a fast disk are a sensible idea. If your are doing a lot of calculations the CPU may come into play. Over the years I have always felt Monarch performed very well in relation to the hardware available at the time. V7 offered a noticable performance improvement over Version 6. Things are pretty much instantaneous until you start to get the more complex projects like my database creation. But the limits there seem to be a factor of isk access rather than heavy memory usage (512Mb never fully used as far as I have seen) or processor (2Ghz P4 which will peak at 100% utilization but never for more than 30% of the time).

           

          In earlier times I have happily used V5 on a PI 166Mh with about 64Mb Ram (and I have a PII 366Mhz notebook with 128Mb RAM which runs fairly large files quite happily if I ask it to and if I create enough disk space!) Also V6 on the PIII at 400Mhz if my memory is correct.

           

          I don't know how much use this information will be for you but unless you have some very extreme requirements I don't think there is anything to be concerned about. I can't remember any observations about performance being posted to the forum in the last year or so, which I guess means that people have not found any issues to raise.

           

          I hope this helps in some way.

           

          All the best.

           

          Grant

           

          Originally posted by Tom Murdock:

          Is there a size limit to the file that can be imported into Monarch?

           

          Are there any special PC requirements for using Version 7 of Monarch?

           

          Thanks,

           

          Tom /b[/quote]

          • Pre-sales Questions
            Tom Whiteside

            Tom, one of the best features of Monarch 7 is it's ability to go beyond the former import file size limitations.  Monarch 6 had an internal MDB that had a practical size limit of 1 GB total table size and 2 GB total MDB size. Monarch 7 provides support for "huge files," greater than or equal to 2 GB. The documentation states that there is "no practical limit" on the size of import input files.

             

            If you need more info, Grant had the right idea in looking at the documentation.  Go to: Datawatch Home Page - Products - Monarch - Literature - V7 Upgrade brochure (.pdf).

             

            As for PC requirements, the brochure states: "Monarch Version 7 Standard and Pro Editions are native 32-bit applications and require Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows

            ME, or Windows NT 4.0+ or Windows XP."  Grant's listed experience with different processors and memory capabilities are well-tested corollaries to the brochure.

             

            Best of luck and welcome to both the best and the most cost-effective report mining program available!